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Favorable 4th Circuit Ruling

Sue Laporte recently obtained a favorable ruling from the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal on behalf of the New Orleans City Council. The trial court had enjoined the Council from overruling the Vieux Carré Commission (VCC) and granting a building permit for 411 Bourbon Street. In an appeal filed before joining our firm, Ms. Laporte urged the Fourth Circuit to uphold the Council’s authority to hear an appeal from and overrule the VCC, and issue a building permit when the VCC repeatedly deferred action on the permit application. Reversing the trial court and dissolving the preliminary injunction, the Fourth Circuit agreed that the New Orleans City Council has the power to hear and decide appeals from the VCC’s failure to act on a building permit application.

Four KPW Attorneys Named to WEN 2018 Board of Directors

KPW congratulates Michele Hale DeShazo, Kristyn Lambert, Skylar Rudin, and Amber Barlow on their selection to the 2018 Board of Directors for the Women’s Energy Network’s (WEN) South Louisiana Chapter. Michele will serve as President, Kristyn will serve as the New Orleans Program Co-Director and Dinner Auction Co-Chair, Skylar will serve as the New Orleans Special Events Director, and Amber holds the position of Scholarships Chair.

Our 2018 Super Lawyers and Rising Stars

Kuchler Polk Weiner is pleased to announce the following members of our team who have been listed by Super Lawyers Magazine as Louisiana Super Lawyers & Rising Stars for 2018: Deb Kuchler, Steve Larzelere, Michele DeShazo, and Lee Ziffer. In addition, Dawn Tezino has been listed by Super Lawyers Magazine as a Texas Super Lawyer for 2018. Congratulations to you all!

 

Louisiana:

Deborah D. Kuchler

Civil Litigation, Personal Injury – Products, Environmental Litigation
Super Lawyers 2008, 2010–2018

Michele Hale DeShazo

Environmental Litigation, Personal Injury – Products, Civil Litigation
Rising Stars 2012–2018

Lee B. Ziffer

Personal Injury – Products, Personal Injury – General, Environmental Litigation
Rising Stars 2014–2018

Stephen M. Larzelere, Sr.

Transportation/Maritime, Environmental Litigation, General Litigation
Super Lawyers: 2013-2014, 2017-2018

Texas:

Dawn R. Tezino

Personal Injury- Products: Defense, Employment Litigation: Defense, Business/Corporate
Rising Stars 2008-2017
Super Lawyers: 2018

Skylar Rudin and Marcus Hunter speak at NOBA Procrastinator’s Program CLE

Associates Skylar Rudin and Marcus Hunter were speakers at the NOBA Procrastinator’s Program CLE on Wednesday, December 13. Marcus, formerly a judicial clerk for the Orleans Civil District Court before he joined Kuchler Polk Weiner, offered insights from his experience as a part of the “Behind the Scenes with Law Clerks” panel.

Skylar, who also served as co-chair of “For Young Lawyers, By Young Lawyers,” the program that organized the CLE, was a part of the “Ethics: Avoiding Malpractice Mistakes – What Every Young Lawyer Should Know” panel. Skylar presented on the topics of inadvertent disclosure and avoiding discovery sanctions.

 

Confidentiality in the Digital Age

Confidentiality in the Digital Age

By: Mark E. Best, Esq.

It seems like every day there is a new story about hackers stealing and publishing confidential personal information.  Even the largest, most tech-savvy telecommunications companies in the world have been proven vulnerable.  It’s one thing to have your name and date of birth exposed; it’s quite another to have your corporation’s trade secrets and litigation-sensitive information fall into the wrong hands.  Good thing your attorney is keeping it safe, right?  After all, “a lawyer shall make reasonable efforts to prevent the inadvertent or unauthorized disclosure of, or unauthorized access to, information relating to the representation of a client.” La. State Bar Art. 16, RPC Rule 1.6(c). So what exactly are the “reasonable efforts” attorneys must make?

In the 1980s, reasonable efforts might have included placing paper documents in a folder marked “confidential” in a file cabinet in a locked office.  With the advent of electronic documents in the 1990s, it was probably reasonable to “burn” CD-ROMs stored under lock and key, or to save client documents to individual computers protected by passwords.  Nowadays, attorneys have 24/7 worldwide access to their clients’ confidential information—and hackers can invade those data streams from the privacy of their own homes. As technology advances, attorneys’ data protection efforts must keep pace. 

The American Bar Association suggests a multi-factor test to determine whether an individual lawyer or firm is keeping up.  Factors include, but are not limited to, the sensitivity of the information, the likelihood of disclosure if additional safeguards are not employed, the cost of employing additional safeguards, the difficulty of implementing the safeguards, and the extent to which the safeguards adversely affect the lawyer’s ability to represent clients.[1]

As with all of our client services, Kuchler Polk Weiner, LLC has found that the best way to ensure compliance with our information protection obligations is to “Lead the Pack” and stay ahead of the curve.  Rather than doing the bare minimum to pass muster under the ABA’s balancing test, we sought guidance from our Fortune 100 clients who are at the forefront of information security.  Several of them employ the best practices recommended by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and others hold ISO/IEC 27001 information security certifications.

ISO/IEC 27001 is the best-known worldwide standard for an information security management system (ISMS).  An ISMS is a systematic approach to managing sensitive company information so that it remains secure. It includes people, processes and IT systems by applying a risk management process.[2] Our firm ISMS ensures that our client data is secure and always available to our staff.  Our customized processes are regularly monitored to ensure all systems are working effectively, so modifications can be implemented to strengthen any weakness. An annual audit is performed by a certified ISO Auditor to measure and verify the effectiveness of our system.

Kuchler Polk Weiner, LLC is one of only a handful of law firms in the United States with an ISO/IEC 27001 Certification and, to our knowledge, the only one in Louisiana at this time.[3]  The certification process is time-consuming, expensive, and not required by law.  So why did we do it?  Our clients go to great lengths to protect their sensitive information.  When they hand it over to us, we want to protect it at least as well, if not better, than they do.

[1]https://www.americanbar.org/groups/professional_responsibility/publications/model_rules_of_professional_conduct/rule_1_6_confidentiality_of_information/comment_on_rule_1_6.html.

[2] https://www.iso.org/isoiec-27001-information-security.html.

[3] For complete ISO survey data, see http://isotc.iso.org/livelink/livelink?func=ll&objId=18808772&objAction=browse&viewType=1.

Louisiana’s Act 312 & Legacy Landowner Litigation

Louisiana’s Act 312 & Legacy Landowner Litigation

By: Sarah C. Thompson

A “legacy” lawsuit is instituted by a landowner who claims that oil and gas operations caused his property to become contaminated.  These suits often name every operator who ever worked at the site as defendants, usually going back decades.  Below is a snapshot graphic of legacy litigation in Louisiana:

Clarifying Minimum Contacts: Personal Jurisdiction over Corporations

Clarifying Minimum Contacts: Personal Jurisdiction over Corporations

By: Etheldreda C. Smith

 

In 2014, following the United States Supreme Court’s decisions in Daimler AG v. Bauman,[1] we provided an update on the shift in policy away from the landmark International Shoe[2] decision regarding states’ exercise of general personal jurisdiction over corporations.  Notably, International Shoe’s “minimum contacts” test for general personal jurisdiction was murky and resulted in judicial expansion of personal jurisdiction as globalization evolved over the last seventy years. Since Daimler, the Court has continued its shift away from International Shoe in the general jurisdiction analysis and also taken aim at exercises of specific jurisdiction that could undermine Daimler. The cases discussed here illustrate the Supreme Court’s desire to realign the states’ exercise of personal jurisdiction over corporations with the constitutional guarantees of due process and the burden placed on the defendant.

The Daimler decision provided clarity to corporations regarding the jurisdictions in which they might be subject to suit under a general jurisdiction analysis. Following Daimler, corporations could be subject to suit only in jurisdictions in which their “affiliations with the State are so continuous and systematic as to render it essentially at home in the forum State.”  Simply put, general personal jurisdiction over corporations can properly be exercised in their state of incorporation or where their principal place of business or corporate headquarters are located. In a footnote, the Supreme Court left open the possibility that in an “exceptional case” a defendant could be subject to general jurisdiction in another state, but did little to elaborate on what factors would create such an “exceptional case;” and subsequent cases have yet to find one.

Walden v. Fiore[3] was decided that same year.  In Walden, the Supreme Court provided further insight into personal jurisdiction—this time focusing on specific personal jurisdiction over foreign defendants.   The Court underscored that the focus of the inquiry is “the relationship among the defendant, the forum, and the litigation” rather than the defendant’s relationship with persons who reside in the forum.  Rather than focusing on the situs of the injury as was done in many prior decisions examining the existence of specific personal jurisdiction, Walden held that the defendant’s suit-related conduct must connect him to the forum state in a meaningful way. Injury might be relevant to that inquiry, but it would no longer be controlling.

Last year, the Supreme Court again granted certiorari for two cases presenting issues of personal jurisdiction: BNSF Railway Co. v. Tyrrell, et al. and Bristol-Myers Squibb Company v. Superior Court of California, et al.

In BNSF, railroad employees filed suit under the Federal Employers’ Liability Act, which makes railroads financially liable for job related injuries sustained by their employees.  In two consolidated cases, the Montana Supreme Court held that Montana could properly exercise general personal jurisdiction[4] over the railroad because it “did business” within the state under Section 65 of FELA and was “found within” the State under Montana Rule of Civil Procedure 4(b)(1).  The Montana Supreme Court further stated that the due process limits articulated in the Daimler decision did not apply to FELA claims or railroad defendants. Writing for eight of the nine members of the Court and reversing the Montana Supreme Court’s holding, Justice Ginsburg explained that the constraints of Daimler apply to “all state-court assertions of general jurisdiction over nonresident defendants; the constraint does not vary with the type of claim asserted or business enterprise sued.”[5]

Bristol-Myers Squibb and BNSF were argued the same day. There, the California Court of Appeal applied Daimler to determine that California lacked general personal jurisdiction over the Plavix manufacturer, but affirmed the lower court’s decision that it had specific jurisdiction over claims asserted by out-of-state plaintiffs by applying a “sliding scale” approach to specific jurisdiction.  Bristol-Meyers Squibb involved claims by both non-resident and domestic plaintiffs, and specific jurisdiction over the non-residents’ claims were at issue.  A divided California Supreme Court found that Bristol-Myers’ “extensive” contacts with California permitted the exercise of a modified version of specific personal jurisdiction over claims by the non-resident plaintiffs; and that the requisite connection between the forum state and the suit-related conduct was “relaxed” where the foreign defendant has wide ranging general contacts with the forum state unrelated to the underlying controversy.  Specific jurisdiction attached to the non-residents’ claims, the court held, in part because the non-residents’ claims were similar in many ways to the California residents’ claims.  Fairness and judicial economy permitted joinder of the residents’ claims (to which specific jurisdiction inarguably applied) and the non-residents’ claims (which had no direct nexus with California).

The Supreme Court reversed and remanded.  Relying on Walden, the same eight justices as in BNSF[6] rejected California’s exercise of specific personal jurisdiction over the non-residents’ claims because there was no nexus between their claims and California. All of the non-residents’ alleged harm in Bristol-Myers was suffered outside of the forum state.  The fact that the California plaintiffs were prescribed, obtained, and ingested the drug in California and sustained the same injuries as the non-residents was insufficient to exercise specific jurisdiction over the non-residents’ claims. According to the Court, specific jurisdiction requires a connection between the forum and the specific claims at issue. The Court further explained that Bristol-Myers’ contractual relationship with a resident co-defendant for distribution of Plavix was insufficient, standing alone,[7] to confer specific personal jurisdiction over the company.

Despite repeated references to the “settled” nature of the law, the Court explicitly left open the question of whether the Fifth Amendment imposes the same due process requirements on federal courts’ exercise of personal jurisdiction as the Fourteenth Amendment does on the states’.[8]  The implication being that these cases signal a marked shift in the jurisprudence dealing with personal jurisdiction over defendant corporations in state courts.

With these cases in mind, new state court matters should be evaluated with a close eye to determine whether the forum’s exercise of general or specific personal jurisdiction over your corporate client is proper.

[1] 134 S.Ct. 746 (2014).

[2] International Shoe Co. v. Washington, 326 U.S. 310 (1945).

[3] 134 S.Ct. 1115 (2014).

[4] Because the workers were not injured in the forum state, an evaluation of specific jurisdiction was not at issue in BNSF.

[5] Justice Sotomayor wrote a partial dissent.  While she concurred with majority’s conclusion that the nature of the claim has no bearing on the personal jurisdictional analysis, she expressed her disapproval of “the path the Court struck in Daimler AG v. Bauman,” and urged for a return to the International Shoe standard.

[6] Justice Sotomayor again dissented.

[7] There were no allegations that the contractual relationship was related to the alleged harm in this case, therefore, the contractual relationship alone would not create specific personal jurisdiction over Bristol-Myers Squibb.

[8] Since Bristol-Meyers Squibb concerned the exercise of personal jurisdiction by a state court, the Court’s analysis focused on due process as applied to the states under the Fourteenth Amendment.  In contrast, the Fifth Amendment provides due process restrictions on federal courts’ exercise of personal jurisdiction; and the Court expressly reserved for another day whether the Fifth Amendment analysis is different.

KPW Sponsors DirectWomen’s 2017 Sandra Day O’Connor Board Excellence Award Luncheon

The firm was a proud sponsor of DirectWomen’s 2017 Sandra Day O’Connor Board Excellence Award Luncheon in New York City on October 20, 2017.  Partners, Sarah Iiams and Michele DeShazo, attended on behalf of the firm and were happy to meet such accomplished ladies.  The mission of DirectWomen is to increase the representation of women on corporate boards through identifying leading women lawyers around the country who will improve corporate governance and increase shareholder value.

We are very pleased that ConocoPhillips Company’s Senior Vice President, Legal, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary, Janet Langford Carrig, was selected as a 2017 DirectWomen Board Institute participant for the October 19-20, 2017 program.  Each year, DirectWomen uses rigorous criteria to identify only the most talented women for the Board Institute training program.  Our firm has been fortunate to view Janet’s extraordinary talents firsthand through our work for ConocoPhillips.  Congratulations, Janet, on this well-deserved honor!

 

Darleene Peters & Katherine Wells attend legal seminar, “Not Just a Pretty Face: Developing Powerful Women of Substance for Success”

Darleene Peters & Katherine Wells attended an empowering legal seminar entitled “Not Just a Pretty Face:  Developing Powerful Women of Substance for Success.” The event was sponsored by The Greater New Orleans Louis A. Martinet Legal Society, Inc. and The Association of Women Attorneys.

Panelists included Dawn Barrios– a local  attorney, Nandi Campbell– local Attorney, Loyola and Tulane Law Professor, and Eboni Williams– attorney, book author, and Fox News Host.  Darleene and Katherine are pictured here with Eboni Williams.